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Cable Catch


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#21 mikest2

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 07:36 PM

View PostAllan, on Jan 14 2007, 07:06 PM, said:

Sigh... here's another from Thursday... Different tower though.

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#22 Allan

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 07:42 PM

Haha! This was the Red chair though... downhill side tower 6 right when I started it in the morning!
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#23 Splicer

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 08:30 AM

The inside catcher worked on this one!

#24 Allan

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 04:55 PM

Heh, nothing like the above pic..

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#25 mikest2

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 07:10 PM

View PostAllan, on Jan 20 2007, 04:55 PM, said:

Heh, nothing like the above pic..

Looks like the drop sheave did it's job. I don't suppose these derails happen at the same time of day on each occasion ? We used to have a phantom (the guy who causes stops) do a number to our T-bar at the same time of day, but just every once and a while.
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#26 Allan

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 12:15 AM

View Postmikest2, on Jan 20 2007, 07:10 PM, said:

Looks like the drop sheave did it's job. I don't suppose these derails happen at the same time of day on each occasion ? We used to have a phantom (the guy who causes stops) do a number to our T-bar at the same time of day, but just every once and a while.


Nah, this was the drunken Selkirk College kids last night... almost exactly what I wrote on the incident report!!
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#27 skierdude9450

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 01:51 PM

What would happen to the grips after going over the cable catchers? Luckily in most cases, the lift would stop before that happened, but if it didn't like in the above pic, what would happen to the grip?
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#28 aug

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 03:19 PM

View Postskierdude9450, on Jan 21 2007, 01:51 PM, said:

What would happen to the grips after going over the cable catchers? Luckily in most cases, the lift would stop before that happened, but if it didn't like in the above pic, what would happen to the grip?

the grips and the rope catchers are designed to be compatible. It is likely in some instances where the grip will go over the rope catcher. if it were not designed this way things would get catastrophic. if you noticed the picture of the inside derail with the chair being flung up over the tower, this event is out of the design parameters and is very unlikely to happen due to design,rope deflectors ,hold down sheaves are part of the design to prevent the inside derail.
"Maybe there is no Heaven. Or maybe this is all pure gibberish—a product of the demented imagination of a lazy drunken hillbilly with a heart full of hate who has found a way to live out where the real winds blow—to sleep late, have fun, get wild, drink whisky, and drive fast on empty streets with nothing in mind except falling in love and not getting arrested . . . Res ipsa loquitur (it speaks for it self). Let the good times roll." HT

#29 aug

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 03:25 PM

View Postskierdude9450, on Jan 21 2007, 01:51 PM, said:

cable catchers?

"dude , the prefered nomenclature is "rope catcher"
"Maybe there is no Heaven. Or maybe this is all pure gibberish—a product of the demented imagination of a lazy drunken hillbilly with a heart full of hate who has found a way to live out where the real winds blow—to sleep late, have fun, get wild, drink whisky, and drive fast on empty streets with nothing in mind except falling in love and not getting arrested . . . Res ipsa loquitur (it speaks for it self). Let the good times roll." HT

#30 mikest2

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 06:54 PM

View Postaug, on Jan 21 2007, 03:25 PM, said:

"dude , the prefered nomenclature is "rope catcher"

For some reason, lost in time, we still refer to them as rope shoes or shoes. It must have to do with translation from the german.
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#31 ceo

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 11:54 AM

View PostSplicer, on Jan 17 2007, 12:30 PM, said:

The inside catcher worked on this one!


And I hope nobody was on that chair! Yikes!

#32 Allan

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Posted 12 August 2007 - 08:28 PM

View PostAllan, on Jan 21 2007, 01:15 AM, said:

Nah, this was the drunken Selkirk College kids last night... almost exactly what I wrote on the incident report!!

Boy did I get questioned when I wrote that on the report! Ahh hindsight = 20/20 - must remember not to offer too much information! :wink:

Anyways - what are these things I've circled in the picture? Are they rope catchers of sorts??

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#33 Allan

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Posted 12 August 2007 - 08:33 PM

Picture from last season's deropement ligthened up.

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#34 Winterhighland

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 06:10 PM

A young skier had enough of the cold and jumped off right before a tower and the bar went over the line and through the sheaves! So don't do it....

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#35 Allan

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 06:25 PM

I hate when that happens, however for a T to be flung up and over the rope, someone's not been paying attention to the braking devices in the springbox. That's why I pull every T every startup - this hasn't happened to us in over 4 years.
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#36 Winterhighland

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 04:29 PM

Apologies for a long delayed response to this thread. Until only a few years ago CairnGorm persisted in using solid wooden t-bars on the more exposed lifts as the extra weight made them swing less in the wind (and wind is a big problem up there!). What's pictured above frustratingly happens all to often here (though mostly it's people bouncing t-bars off the backboard of the return wheel instead of feeding them into the spring box - all the t-bars are bullwheel unloads) and while wind might be a factor I wonder if a good number of the spring boxes still date from the era of wooden t-bars and thus retract too violently for the modern lightweight plastic ones?

#37 mikest2

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 05:07 PM

View PostWinterhighland, on Oct 12 2007, 05:29 PM, said:

Apologies for a long delayed response to this thread. Until only a few years ago CairnGorm persisted in using solid wooden t-bars on the more exposed lifts as the extra weight made them swing less in the wind (and wind is a big problem up there!). What's pictured above frustratingly happens all to often here (though mostly it's people bouncing t-bars off the backboard of the return wheel instead of feeding them into the spring box - all the t-bars are bullwheel unloads) and while wind might be a factor I wonder if a good number of the spring boxes still date from the era of wooden t-bars and thus retract too violently for the modern lightweight plastic ones?

Having done a lot of work on Doppelmayr type 2 and 2mt boxes, adjusting the brake is an art, it can be greatly influenced by temperature, humidity and wear.
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#38 cjb

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 04:24 PM

They are derail switches of some sort. The rope would hit either of the two prongs and then the back of that unit pivots and either:
a- breaks a brittle bar or card or
b- severs a cut wire
either of which stops the lift
I believe the larger bars are to prevent the rope from going past that point in the event of a deropement and I don't think they serve any other function.


Anyways - what are these things I've circled in the picture? Are they rope catchers of sorts??
[/quote]

This post has been edited by cjb: 13 October 2007 - 04:27 PM


#39 Allan

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 11:48 AM

View Postcjb, on Oct 13 2007, 05:24 PM, said:

They are derail switches of some sort. The rope would hit either of the two prongs and then the back of that unit pivots and either:
a- breaks a brittle bar or card or
b- severs a cut wire
either of which stops the lift
I believe the larger bars are to prevent the rope from going past that point in the event of a deropement and I don't think they serve any other function.
Anyways - what are these things I've circled in the picture? Are they rope catchers of sorts??


Heh, I knew what those were, I meant the thing directly in front of the "wishbone" forks - the pipe above the guide sheave.
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#40 cjb

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 03:22 PM

After looking at the picture closer I realized what you were asking about, as far as I know the pipe is just to limit how far up the rope can go in the case of a deropement.





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